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Gangster Warlords: Drug Dollars, Killing Fields, and the New Politics of Latin America
Ioan Grillo
Did not read yet
Added: 3/9/2016

Station Eleven: A novel
Emily St. John Mandel
Did not read yet
Added: 10/1/2014

Landline
Rainbow Rowell
Did not read yet
Added: 8/1/2014

The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry: A Novel
Gabrielle Zevin
Did not read yet
Added: 5/22/2014

And the Mountains Echoed
Khaled Hosseini
Did not read yet
Added: 3/7/2014

Annihilation: A Novel (Southern Reach Trilogy)
Jeff VanderMeer
Did not read yet
Added: 3/7/2014

The Goldfinch
Donna Tartt
Did not read yet
Added: 3/7/2014

The Circle
Dave Eggers
Did not read yet
Added: 11/1/2013

The Maid's Version: A Novel
Daniel Woodrell
Did not read yet
Added: 11/1/2013

Lexicon
Max Barry
Did not read yet
Added: 11/1/2013

Cryptic Spaces: Book One: Foresight
Deen Ferrell
Did not read yet
Added: 9/30/2013

The Ocean at the End of the Lane: A Novel
Neil Gaiman
Did not read yet
Added: 8/1/2013

The Humanity Project
Jean Thompson
Did not read yet
Added: 6/3/2013

Life After Life: A Novel
Kate Atkinson
Did not read yet
Added: 4/5/2013

Three Graves Full
Jamie Mason
Did not read yet
Added: 3/28/2013

The Good House: A Novel
Ann Leary
Did not read yet
Added: 1/31/2013

The Dinner
Herman Koch
Did not read yet
Added: 1/31/2013

This Is How You Lose Her
Junot Diaz
Did not read yet
Added: 1/3/2013

Gone Girl: A Novel
Gillian Flynn
Did not read yet
Added: 11/28/2012

Mr. Penumbra's 24-Hour Bookstore: A Novel
Robin Sloan
Did not read yet
Added: 11/4/2012

The Casual Vacancy
J.K. Rowling
Did not read yet
Added: 10/24/2012

Something Wicked This Way Comes
Ray Bradbury
Did not read yet
Added: 9/10/2012

The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry: A Novel
Rachel Joyce
Did not read yet
Added: 8/17/2012

The Age of Miracles: A Novel
Karen Thompson Walker
Did not read yet
Added: 7/1/2012

Let's Pretend This Never Happened: (A Mostly True Memoir)
Jenny Lawson
Did not read yet
Added: 6/1/2012

Farsighted
Emlyn Chand
Did not read yet
Added: 5/5/2012

The Professionals
Owen Laukkanen
Did not read yet
Added: 3/30/2012

Until the Next Time
Kevin Fox
Did not read yet
Added: 2/28/2012

The Anatomy of Ghosts
Andrew Taylor
Did not read yet
Added: 1/27/2012

The Angel Makers
Jessica Gregson
Did not read yet
Added: 12/30/2011

The Sense of an Ending (Borzoi Books)
Julian Barnes
Very Unleashable
Added: 12/1/2011

Nightwoods: A Novel
Charles Frazier
Very Unleashable
Added: 11/1/2011

The Leftovers
Tom Perrotta
Very Unleashable
Added: 10/11/2011

The Most Dangerous Thing
Laura Lippman
Unleash it
Added: 9/1/2011

The Borrower: A Novel
Rebecca Makkai
Unleash it
Added: 7/29/2011

In Leah's Wake
Terri Giuliano Long
Very Unleashable
Added: 7/15/2011

Bossypants
Tina Fey
DEFINITELY Unleash it
Added: 5/31/2011

The Pale King
David Foster Wallace
Mildly Unleashable
Added: 4/27/2011

The Paris Wife: A Novel
Paula McLain
DEFINITELY Unleash it
Added: 3/31/2011

The Other Life
Ellen Meister
DEFINITELY Unleash it
Added: 3/31/2011

The Last Days of Judas Iscariot
Stephen Adly Guirgis
Very Unleashable
Added: 11/2/2010

The Road (Movie Tie-in Edition)
Cormac Mccarthy
Did not read yet
Added: 7/27/2010

Naked
David Sedaris
Very Unleashable
Added: 7/6/2010

Looks Easy Enough: A Joyful Memoir of Overcoming Disease, Divorce, and Disaster
Scott Stevenson
Unleash it
Added: 7/1/2010

Jesus Land: A Memoir
Julia Scheeres
Unleash it
Added: 6/4/2010

Walking to Gatlinburg: A Novel
Howard Frank Mosher
Unleash it
Added: 5/24/2010

Angelology: A Novel
Danielle Trussoni
Unleash it
Added: 4/27/2010

The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
Rebecca Skloot
Unleash it
Added: 4/26/2010

The Pursuit of Other Interests: A Novel
Jim Kokoris
Unleash it
Added: 4/6/2010

Blonde Roots
Bernardine Evaristo
Unleash it
Added: 3/2/2010

Weekends at Bellevue
Julie Holland
Do not Unleash
Added: 2/20/2010

Confessions of an Ugly Stepsister: A Novel
Gregory Maguire
Unleash it
Added: 1/30/2010
 
 
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Angelology: A Novel
Date Posted: 4/27/2010 | Go To Book Page

I sense that angels might be the new vampires.  Angelology explores a fascinating subject, angels, and ups the interesting by presenting us with a world where angels live among us.  These are not, however, your halo-sporting, Christmas-tree topping angels.  Trussoni navigates us through the uneasy (to say the least) existence of two groups with interests on opposite sides of the celestial line.  Her story spans decades (WWII - modern day) and continents (Europe and North America), which in this case added to the enjoyment of the story.  The intrigue escalates as the book progresses and culminates in a battle of good and evil, but neither the outcome nor the events leading up to that moment are predictable.  A very enjoyable and captivating read throughout.   
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Blonde Roots
Date Posted: 3/6/2010 | Go To Book Page

I found this to be a very gratifying read.  It's been an embarrasingly LONG time since I've read something outside of the New Yorker or short story realm (I suppose emails and the news on the elevator in my office building don't count either), but this was a good re-introduction.  The topic was thought-provoking. I found the use of sections a good way to present the contrasting perspectives of the blak owner and whyte slave. The images in my head were definitely twisted at times, which only lent to the fulfillment I got from Blonde Roots' challenging of convention. There was so much to this relatively small book.  Lessons in courage, the dreadfulness of slavery, dignity in the face of adversity all in the context of a flipped historical vantage. 
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Cleopatra: A Life
Date Posted: 1/11/2011 | Go To Book Page

Cleopatra...Queen of the Novel!  Truth really is stranger than fiction.  Or at least more fascinating as Stacy Schiff proves in Cleopatra, A Life.  I only knew bits of the story of Cleopatra and that was from watching Rome, but Schiff presents a historical account that is both informative and entertaining.  The book keeps the pace moving and doesn't skimp on the details.  I came away feeling as if I had a basis for understanding not only of Cleopatra and her storied Alexandria, but of the political and social context of the time.  Schiff presents a vivid account of a captivating woman and her unparalled contribution to history (or perhaps herstory). 
Very Unleashable

In Leah's Wake
Date Posted: 8/3/2011 | Go To Book Page

This book is terrifying.  As a soon-to-be first time parent, this account of a family's unraveling became a cautionary tale of what not to do when your teenage daughter "mixes with the wrong crowd".  While it's easy to judge, the chorus of "not so fast" was running through my head because I can't say what I would do faced with the same or similar circumstances.  Since the story is told from the vantage of all the family members - the parents, Leah - the rebellious teen, Justine - the younger sister, and a police officer involved with the family, I felt fully immersed and even like a helpless bystander watching the personal plight of each person.  You don't need to be a parent or a member of a dysfunctional family to find the human universals within this novel.  There are lessons in coummunication, alienation, the pressures for success, mercy, and the interconnectedness of people.  I was surprised to learn that this was the author's first novel.  She handled some weighty topics without being heavy-handed affording the reader space to insert their own questions and inferences.
Very Unleashable

Looks Easy Enough: A Joyful Memoir of Overcoming Disease, Divorce, and Disaster
Date Posted: 7/27/2010 | Go To Book Page

Inspiring.  Humbling.  Heart wrenching.  Humorous.  And that's just the first chapter.  Although this spirit is beautifully maintained throughout the book to the very last page.  Scott Stevenson's Looks Easy Enough is one of those books that you would recommend to someone who is going through a major life event.  That is actually what I did  as the day I finished reading it, a colleague's wife was diagnosed with breast cancer.  And if you have any reservations about whether this inspirational tale is captivating, twice while I was reading on the bus I nearly missed my stop.  Even if you think you don't need a dose of optimism, I think you will find something helpful to take away from this book.  I have no doubt that the message of this book is one that will stay with me should I ever have a moment where I need to summon strength, patience, charity, or hope from the reserves.  My gratitude to Mr. Stevenson for writing about his moving and engaging experience.  
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Nightwoods: A Novel
Date Posted: 12/6/2011 | Go To Book Page

It’s telling when two of the most compelling characters hardly have any dialogue.  In Charles Frazier’s (author of Cold Mountain) Nightwoods, those characters are children whose mother has been murdered and stepfather is responsible, according to the murdered woman’s sister, Luce, who has become caretaker to the children.  Luce is another fascinating character.  She lives a secluded and simple life (for which the motivation is made clearer throughout the book), living in and tending to a remote lodge entrusted to her by the deceased owner.  Even though Luce is a young woman, I often visualized her to be more middle-aged.  Likewise, I often forgot that this was set in the 1950s, which I suppose both speak to the timelessness of the story. Another key character to both the Luce and the children and the story is Stubblefield the grandson of the lodge’s original proprieter and eventually Luce’s suitor.  The story itself is just as captivating as the characters.  When the children’s father, Bud, turns up, the peaceful Appalachian town is shaken by cases of murder and missing children.  Bud ingratiates himself to a segment community, including Sherriff Lit who is also Luce's father (and the father of Bud's murdered x-wife) by becoming the local moonshiner.  Like the silence of the children, there is a lot unspoken in this story, although not in a negative way.  The one thing most of these characters experience is a disruption of their simple routine.  Luce by the arrival of the children and Stubblefield by his inheritance of his grandfather’s property and involvement with Luce, and Lit  by the arrival of Bud.  Even though there is a lot of tragedy, I didn't feel the story was weighted by it.  Maddie, Luce’s friend and neighbor, seems representative of that persistence in her steadfast and unfaltering approach to life.  Perhaps also like, Maddie, this was a quietly memorable book with a lot of potential for discussion.    
Very Unleashable

Our Tragic Universe
Date Posted: 12/3/2010 | Go To Book Page

Other than a common gender and generation, I would not liken myself to Meg Carpenter (the central character of Our Tragic Universe). 
I don't suspect we would occupy the same social circles.  She's artistic and a bit of an intellectual.  She has the kind of schedule that
allows you to have a leisurely lunch in the middle of the week.  I'm not saying I would not aspire to such an existence, yet despite
these surface disparities, I found myself identifying with her in some ways, if not rooting for her.  I've even found the motivation to
take up knitting (which I have been intending to do for the better part of a decade), due to Meg's delight and enthusiasm for the pursuit.  
And Meg is not the only agreeable character in the book.  Scarlett Thomas has a way of presenting even seemingly dispicable creatures
in a sympathetic light.  The story is compelling and smart, both in content and the varied way it is told.  Even the book itself is original
with the pages attractively edged in black when the book is closed and its intriguing cover in black and gold to compliment the pages. 
I imagined that my fellow commuters looked at me and would surmise that I was a fascinating person for reading such a book!  
Something about Thomas's writing, perhaps the strong female characters and the adept handling of complicated topics reminded me of
my beloved Margaret Atwood.  I will definitely seek out more works by this author.
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Room: A Novel
Date Posted: 11/4/2010 | Go To Book Page

Since my friends and family have tired of me talking about this book, I'm seeking new outlets to praise the fantastic Room.  I must admit, if someone described this book to me, I don't believe I would be compelled to read it...a story about the life of a woman and her son held captive in a room as told by the 5 year old son...forget it!  What they say is true, you cannot judge a book by its cover, or in this case the description on its cover.  Contrary to all my pre-conceived notions the story told from the son, Jack's, perspective only lends to revealing the positive in an otherwise deplorable circumstance.  Jack's wide-eyed amazement at the beauty of the seemingly mundane was a refreshing reminder of how life is largely comprised of  "ordinariness" though it need not be overlooked and in fact should be embraced.  Though Donaghue is careful not to exclude the other reality that life is sometimes hard.  I suspect I am not the only one who sometimes feels overloaded by the mass of information and obligations that occupy our lives and world.  Jack and his mother's experience reinforces a place for simplicity in our lives.  Jack is a hero, not just for the act that changes he and his mother's life, but for his reminder to appreciate what we have. 
DEFINITELY Unleash it

The Borrower: A Novel
Date Posted: 9/12/2011 | Go To Book Page

I had some mixed feelings about The Borrower.  That's not to say that I didn't like it.  In fact, I liked it very much overall.  The writing was inviting from the first page, the humor was fantastic, and the characters were engaging.  So far so really good.  It was the ending that lost me a bit.  Even though I was caught up in Lucy and Ian's road trip gone awry and was ultimately rooting for them to not get caught, for some crazy reason, I felt let down that Lucy did "get away with it".  Maybe I watch too many crime shows or was longing for a moral to the story.  There were times throughout their adventures that a voice in my head would scream, "just put an end to this madness", but mostly the unlikely partnering of a boy and his librarian made for a very enjoyable read.  I especially love the "how to (insert activity here) like a 10-year old boy" lists. and the smart and nostalgic references to childrens' books (with extra credit for the title of this book, which I'm guessing is a nod to The Borrowers series by Mary Norton).  I breezed through this book easily and would hope to see more by author Rebecca Makkai.  
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The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks
Date Posted: 6/3/2010 | Go To Book Page

If the Sci-Fi channel, the History Channel, Discovery, and Lifetime had a child, it would look something like The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks.  This biography/family epic/medical history/current events book has got it all; tragedy, medical intrigue, racial discrimination, the shortcomings of our health care system are all integral to the legacy of Henrietta Lacks.  It was hard at times to learn of the series of injustices that befell the Lacks family while, long unbeknownst to them, Henrietta’s cells were revolutionizing medical research.  The author’s dedication to revealing the history of Henrietta’s medical and family life is beyond commendable.  By gaining the confidence of the rightfully skeptical family, she endears us to them and brings some small solace to what they’ve endured by letting the world in on the best kept medical secret of the century.  The author also does a good job at balancing the material so it’s not too heavy on the medical, but not too condescending for those of us that are not MDs or PhDs.  Definitely a worthwhile read and a timely one as well given the current debate on health care.

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The Leftovers
Date Posted: 10/31/2011 | Go To Book Page

The Most Dangerous Thing
Date Posted: 10/6/2011 | Go To Book Page

The Other Life
Date Posted: 4/4/2011 | Go To Book Page

Quinn Braverman is a woman faced with a distressing reality, a place we have all inhabited at some point.  What distinguishes Quinn from the rest of us (or at least me) is that Quinn has access to an alternate reality.  Due to circumstances that are explained later in the book, Quinn has the ability to travel between her current life with her husband and son and a parallel life where her mother is still alive and she is not burdened by the troubling circumstances she has been dealt.  Her foray into the alternate reality is not an easy one in either a psychological or physical sense.  In fact, it becomes increasingly more difficult to make the passage between her present life and her “other life”.  Rather than finding Quinn’s ability alienating and unrelatable, I think the author, Ellen Meister, used it to great effect to relate the pain of loss and to punctuate the consequences of our choices.  This book also heightened my sense of appreciation for living in the moment.  As I was reading this book, my father underwent emergency surgery and is thankfully doing fine, but I could not help but wonder what if…I know this review is a bit of a jumbled mess, but The Other Life really roused a lot of emotions in me.  I will only add, since other reviewers mentioned “sci fi” and “romance” that I had no prior notion of where The Other Life might be shelved in the book store, but my impression upon completing it is that it was neither.  It may dabble in both, but I wouldn’t say it is firmly entrenched in either, which for me was a positive.  I can say with no uncertainty that I savored every moment of this book.

DEFINITELY Unleash it

The Pale King
Date Posted: 6/10/2011 | Go To Book Page

My "mildly unleashable" rating  may be more indicative of the type of reader that I am than how this book should be rated.  One thing I can state with certainty is that this is one of the most challenging things I have ever read and had I not been reading this for the book club, I likely would have abandoned it early on.  That said, I am glad that I didn't bail because even in my sometimes bewildered and sometimes weary (this is the only book where I think I have actually skipped whole pages) state David Foster Wallace's brilliance is glaringly apparent.  When I was able to approach the book as a collection of stories rather than a novel, it allowed me to start to absorb it and even enjoy it.  I’m not sure enjoy is the ideal word; appreciate might be better.  I was particularly moved by how Wallace’s descriptions of sometimes mundane, sometimes excruciatingly personal and painful experiences are gently treated, but not in a way that induces pity, but real, heartfelt sympathy.  A sympathy that, for me, started to extend beyond the book to people that I overlook or even avoid every day.  My husband says, that if everyone wrote or told their story it would be worthy of hearing or reading.  And he’s not the only one to embrace this idea.  NPR’s This American Life and the segment on CBS Sunday Morning where the reporter picks a random place on the globe and then a random name in the phone book and interviews them, are just a few.  And it was hard for me not to think about the author’s own life and death while he was in the midst of writing this book as you’re reading some of the passages.  I did find myself thinking about the book quite a bit.  Not in a way that I think about other books –wondering what’s going to happen next, but actually thinking about life and the things and people and moments I have overlooked for whatever reason.  This is a book that I could see myself coming back to and reading again.  Maybe not in the way I read it this time, cover to cover, but take my time and savor it.  Just as the book has reminded me that that’s how life itself should be approached. 
Mildly Unleashable

The Paris Wife: A Novel
Date Posted: 5/2/2011 | Go To Book Page

A larger-than-life personality such as Ernest Hemingway can be hard to contain, but Paula McClain, the author of The Paris Wife, and Hadley Hemingway, Hemingway’s “Paris wife” both handle it adeptly (well, the latter at least for a time).  Through Hadley’s voice, McClain transports us to a time when Ernest Hemingway was a still unknown burgeoning writer in Chicago.  It is then that he meets Hadley Richardson, a seemingly unlikely women to capture the affections of the adventurous Ernest Hemingway we know.  At 28, Hadley’s sheltered life is such a contrast to the experiences the younger Ernest has already had.  As the beginning of the story sweetly unfolds and more is unveiled about the parallels Ernest and Hadley experienced in their youth, the bond begins to make sense.  After a mostly long distance courtship of letters, the two married and set off for Paris.  While Ernest’s unbridled ambition and undeniable talent was the obvious impetus that set them on this path, Hadley’s steadfast support and companionship offered the stability and affirmation needed to set the stage for Hemingway’s introduction to Paris and then the world.  I’m afraid my description of The Paris Wife is misrepresenting Hadley as a secondary character when this book is really her story.  But perhaps that’s appropriate.  Hadley’s life was largely guided by Ernest’s ambitions.  A talented woman in her own rite, Hadley set aside her own aspirations to fully commit to Ernest.  Yet, as I was reading, I never disrespected Hadley – quite the contrary.  Perhaps it’s because I found her to be selfless, and patient, and understanding, and charming and witty.  I’m certain it is also a tribute to the stunning writing, as one other reviewer alluded to.  And despite Ernest Hemingway’s reputation, he clearly has great love and affection for Hadley.  I will look forward to seeing the discussion questions, particularly people’s thoughts on the “role of an artist’s wife” (which Hadley herself even mentioned as she was forced into socialization with Alice Toklas and Dorothy Shakespear - Ezra Pound’s wife – and the other wives of the Paris artists and intellectuals).  I loved this book for its portrayal of Paris during an incomparable age, for an actually likeable depiction of Ernest Hemingway, and for introducing me to Hadley.  I’m inclined now to read Hemingway’s parallel account in A Moveable Feast.

(Fun fact, this weekend I came across a movie starring Marial Hemingway (her father is “Bumby” – Ernest and Hadley’s son) called The Mean Season.  Unlike this book, I would not recommend it.

DEFINITELY Unleash it

The Pursuit of Other Interests: A Novel
Date Posted: 4/7/2010 | Go To Book Page

Kokoris offers a light-hearted account of the often very un-funny subject of unemployment. While I would file this book in the humor category, it's not without it's tender-hearted moments.  As the main character, Charlie, a man once defined by his career, treads precariously through his life without a job he rediscovers that there IS life outside work and that includes his long-suffering wife and shaggy-haired, teenage son.  But what is humor and compassion or any emotion without a being to which to attach it?  Enter the characters.  Kokoris effectively familiarizes us with his characters.  In addition to having a vivid visual image of each, I found myself reacting to them on the page (Bradley evoked uneasiness, Karen, suspicion, and Ned...).  Ned, the well-meaning "transition consultant" was the glue that held these crazies together.  And in a sense, they seemed to reciprocate.  It makes sense that business and personal would mesh in this environment.  I found myself rooting for Ned throughout the book.  Even the, at times, deplorable Charlie had his redeeming moments.  Kokoris presents us with a cast of likeable characters in the context of a transition point in their lives.  The result is an enjoyable, humorous story with a hint of the "our lives are not defined by our jobs" message, of which I am happy to be reminded.

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The Radleys: A Novel
Date Posted: 2/14/2011 | Go To Book Page

Like other reviewers, I was pleasantly surprised by The Radleys.  Nothing against vampires, but I'm really more of a zombie person.  I'm not saying I've been bitten and have succumbed to the current vampire fervor, but  then again, I wouldn't really call this a "vampire book".  The book for me was really about a family dealing with individual and collective struggles who happened to be vampires.  And yes, that was a MAJOR factor in those struggles, but the most touching and memorable aspects of the the book were the human elements - the longing for acceptance and the pain of ridicule and rejection, the loss of connection between a husband and wife - these are what grabbed and held my attention.  And like vampires themselves are noted to be, there is something irrisistable about this book.  I found myself eagerly anticipating reading it each day. Don't be misled by my earlier reference to the elements of conflict and turmoil.  The author, Matt Haig, effectively applied humor and wit.  This is simply a beautifully written, captivating, and thoroughly enjoyable book whether you are a vampire, a fan of vampires, or someone or something else.
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The Sense of an Ending (Borzoi Books)
Date Posted: 1/5/2012 | Go To Book Page

The Thieves of Manhattan: A Novel
Date Posted: 8/19/2010 | Go To Book Page

I loved this book. Behind this sometimes quirky and often funny story is a pointed commentary on the publishing industry and its cohorts. Don't fret though. The message never weighs the book down and it's not all dismal.  Not at all.  Adding to the enjoyment, Langer rewards fans of literature by inserting references throughout. I would recommend the Thieves of Manhattan for anyone who likes suspense and thrillers (twist alert) and for all you humor enthusiasts.  It's perfect for commuters, stay-at-home dads, busy types, slackers, fitness buffs, foodies, and your Aunt Doris.  It's just a good little read that is not small-minded.  I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

DEFINITELY Unleash it

The Tower, The Zoo, and The Tortoise: A Novel
Date Posted: 10/11/2010 | Go To Book Page

Beyond the historic walls of the Tower of London lies a captivating world as revealed by Julia Stuart in The Tower, The Zoo, and The Tortoise.  Sometimes amusing, often whimsical, and with an underlying sadness, the imaginative tales that are told of the Tower's residents find their way into your heart and mind.  Much of the story is built on introspection, befitting of the enclosed walls of the Tower.  The focal characters are especially adept at maintaining their internal dialogue - ultimately at the expenses of their marriage.  Other characters are equally as captivating and tight-lipped, which for me made me feel like a confidant of sorts.  Very early on in the book, I realized the narrator in my head was the voice of the narrator from the TV show Pushing Daisies, which is indeed a compliment of comparison.  Utterly delightful.   
DEFINITELY Unleash it

The Weird Sisters
Date Posted: 3/28/2011 | Go To Book Page

I was absorbed in this book from the first page through the end.  Perhaps it was the setting in a small Midwestern town, which I can relate to.  Or being the first-born, like the oldest sister in the story, Rose (even though, my younger sister is quite frankly, "the responsible one").  Maybe it's because, like Bianca - the middle sister - I lived in New York and moved back to my home town and like Cordelia, the youngest sister, was uncertain of the direction my life would take at that point.  Enough about me though.  This beautifully-written book gently meanders through the past and present lives of the Andreas sisters who have all found themselves living together in their childhood home with their parents. While their familial bond may have been strained at times, there is no question that a love of books has been an unwavering presence and connection throughout their lives.  The refreshing absence of technology lent a timelessness to the Weird Sisters that was reinforced by the ever-relevant Shakespearean references, courtesy of the Andreas patriarch's life-long commitment as a Shakespearean scholar and professor.  I wish I could borrow some of author Eleanor Brown's elegance and easiness with words right now to explain how much I enjoyed this book.  Perhaps I will just leave it at, "all's well that ends well."    
Very Unleashable

Walking to Gatlinburg: A Novel
Date Posted: 7/8/2010 | Go To Book Page

Walking to Gatlingburg had a lot going for it, which kept my interest to the very last page. A tumultuous Civil War setting provided an appropriate context for young Morgan Kinneson's outrageous and often perilous encounters on his journey to find his brother.  This book is 3 parts adventure tale and 1 part historical novel.  This is not a criticism, just a caution to those that may be seeking a historical account of the Civil War. While certainly not devoid of history, especially in presenting the mores of certain segments of the United States at the time, the richness of this book lies in the colorful characters.  All of these characters are linked through seventeen-year old Morgan Kinneson.  Morgan's quest to find his brother, Pilgrim, whose fate is unknown since going to be a doctor for the Union army, start off with a literal bang resulting in the death of a slave Morgan is ushering across the border to Canada.  This is where the story of this slave and Morgan's own start to become intertwined in unexpected ways.  At times whimsical, at times exciting, and oftentimes suspenseful, Howard Frank Mosher's unique coming-of-age tale is a captivating read offering a glimpse at one of the most volatile periods in US history and a wide-eyed view of the world of a zealous, sympathetic, and adventurous young boy’s journey of discovery. 


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