The Goldfinch

By Donna Tartt
Binding:Hardcover
Publisher:Little, Brown and Company, (10/22/2013)
Language:English



Average Rating:
Very Unleashable
4.00 out of 5 (3 Clubie's ratings)


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"The Goldfinch is a rarity that comes along perhaps half a dozen times per decade, a smartly written literary novel that connects with the heart as well as the mind....Donna Tartt has delivered an extraordinary work of fiction."--Stephen King, The New York Times Book Review

Composed with the skills of a master, The Goldfinch is a haunted odyssey through present day America and a drama of enthralling force and acuity.

It begins with a boy. Theo Decker, a thirteen-year-old New Yorker, miraculously survives an accident that kills his mother. Abandoned by his father, Theo is taken in by the family of a wealthy friend. Bewildered by his strange new home on Park Avenue, disturbed by schoolmates who don't know how to talk to him, and tormented above all by his unbearable longing for his mother, he clings to one thing that reminds him of her: a small, mysteriously captivating painting that ultimately draws Theo into the underworld of art.

As an adult, Theo moves silkily between the drawing rooms of the rich and the dusty labyrinth of an antiques store where he works. He is alienated and in love-and at the center of a narrowing, ever more dangerous circle.

The Goldfinch is a novel of shocking narrative energy and power. It combines unforgettably vivid characters, mesmerizing language, and breathtaking suspense, while plumbing with a philosopher's calm the deepest mysteries of love, identity, and art. It is a beautiful, stay-up-all-night and tell-all-your-friends triumph, an old-fashioned story of loss and obsession, survival and self-invention, and the ruthless machinations of fate.
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Harriet's thoughts on "The Goldfinch"
updated on:7/3/2014



Very Unleashable



Book Junky's thoughts on "The Goldfinch"
updated on:1/1/2014

This is the “How I Met your Mother” of books. I mean, I like that show, and I liked this book, but it is one loooooong convoluted way to tell a story. I mean looooong… but I did enjoy it. The writing really sucked you in and made you happy to get back to it each night, but it also had me mentally screaming at it, “Shut up! Shut up already!! We get it. This is what was happening at that point in his life. We get it. Now, MOVE ON!” …then a bit little bit later, “Seriously, shut up already!!!” …then it would move on and be quite lovely. I also loved that I had no real idea where it was going, but I knew it would all intertwine in a wonderful way. Which it did, only to reach the end and get to these wonderful philosophical points that that made you think - which I just love love love in book… but also just had me about in tears because the FREAKIN’ Kindle would not seem to get off 98% and I thought it would NEVER END! Oh-my-gosh! Seriously, “SHUT UP already!”… but great thoughts that one day I will want to revisit by reread the last 3% of this book to really absorb…. but at a much later date when I am not so sick of it. Total love-hate with this book. Really enjoyed it, but by the end really hated how long it was. All kidding aside the editor should have forced the writer to condense it by at least 15% - which would have been very easy to do. Move it along, we get the point. (Oh, you are sick of me saying that? Well, now you get my point.) I highly recommend the book, but only if you are NOT reading it for a book club that meets monthly. It is just toooooooo long for a one month reading (especially one with the holiday distractions). If you force yourself to do that, I think you just get too overwhelmed and sick of the massive amount of reading to cram in at the end (like I did). BUT, if you are looking for a nice long book to enjoy for a long time - this is great! Intricate story with interesting characters. The main character, Theo, though fascinating to “watch” as an adolescent dealing with tragedy and making poor choices, quickly becomes cringe worthy but all so human and easy to relate to as his behaviors continue. Which I think creates a lot of good talking points that will lead to some good book club discussions. Other great talking points including: class, alcoholism, art, the foster system, death, tragedy, work ethics, the value of objects, parenting, friendship and love to name just a few. Plenty to discuss, but give yourself a lot of time to meander through the reading to really enjoy the entirety of the book.

Very Unleashable



Ceci's thoughts on "The Goldfinch"
updated on:1/1/2014

Let’s just cut to the chase. This book is long – very long. For some, that automatically disqualified THE GOLDFINCH from your reading list. For those not put off by the length, who have strong arms, or just dashed off a new year’s resolution to increase your arm strength, continue with me. This book is not pointlessly bloated like a summer blockbuster movie. Its heft is the very point. Hold the book for a minute. Feel how heavy it is? That is just a fraction of the unending burden of shame, guilt and grief that Theo carries throughout his adolescence and into adulthood. The novel’s length also leaves room for countless characters, providing them plenty of opportunities to stretch, surprise, and disappoint. It’s a captivating cast, major and minor, and thank goodness for that because, while Theo is one of the most affecting and resonant portraits of grief I have read, his “poor me,” “what if?” naval-gazing can be a bit annoying at times. (Although a pretty accurate depiction of a teenager, now that I think about it.) I also can’t help but appreciate the wit of this weightiest of novels being named for such a tiny bird. Of course, a goldfinch is not merely a bird, but the work of art that is a keystone in Theo’s self-identity, and there’s much to contemplate about that whether you are reading on your own or with your book club. The Goldfinch painting, often a plot device (that “fateful object”), often a launching point for deep thoughts on art, life, and morality (“Can’t good come around sometimes through some strange backdoors”), and never just a painting, is a character in its own right. But, enough from me. Don’t spend your time reading reviews – read the book!

Very Unleashable


"The Goldfinch"
By Donna Tartt

Average Rating:
Very Unleashable
4.00 out of 5 (3 Clubie's ratings)


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